History of Ferris

1870
(3rd year of the Meiji Era)
Mary E. Kidder starts teaching at Mrs. Hepburn's facility. This marks the beginning of Ferris Seminary.
1875
(8th year of the Meiji Era)
School building and boarding facilities at 178 Yamate completes. The school named Ferris Seminary.
1889
(22nd year of the Meiji Era)  
School renamed Ferris Waei Jyogakko (Ferris Japanese-English Girl's School).
Van Schaick Hall completes.
1923
(12th year of the Taisho Era)
Ferris school buildings destroyed and Ms. Kuyper, the headmistress, killed in the Great Kanto Earthquake.
1929
(4th year of the Showa Era)
School building named Kuyper Memorial Hall completes on Yamate Campus.
1941
(16th year of the Showa Era)
School renamed Yokohama Yamate Girl's School during World War II.
1947
(22nd year of the Showa Era)
Vocational school (old system) with three-year courses in English Literature, Home Economics, and Music set up.
1950
(25th year of the Showa Era)
School renamed Ferris Girl's School. Vocational School becomes Junior College (English Literature and Home Economics). Music Course opens in the following year.
1965
(40th year of the Showa Era)
Ferris Women's College established with two departments: the Department of English Literature and the Department of Japanese Literature.
1970
(45th year of the Showa Era)
100th anniversary of founding
1988
(63rd year of the Showa Era)
The Department of Asia and European Studies instituted. Ryoken Campus opens.
1989
(1st year of the Heisei Era)  
The College of Music instituted with three departments: the Department of Vocal Music, the Department of Instrumental Music, and the Department of Musicology.
School building named Ferris Hall completed on Yamate Campus.
1991
(3rd year of the Heisei Era)
The Graduate School (Master's Course), the Division of Humanities instituted.
1993
(5th year of the Heisei Era)
Japanese Literature Department of the Faculty of Letters renamed the Department of Japanese Literature.
1995
(7th year of the Heisei Era)
The Division of Humanities reorganized into Graduate School (Master's/Doctoral).
1997
(9th year of the Heisei Era)
The Faculty of Global and Inter-cultural Studies (the Department of Global and Inter-cultural Studies) instituted.
1998
(10th year of the Heisei Era)
The Graduate School (Master's Course), the Division of Music instituted.
The center of international exchange students opens.
2001
(13th year of the Heisei Era)
The Graduate School (Master's/Doctoral Courses), the Division of Global and Inter-cultural Studies instituted. Ryokuen Campus facility expanded (Building for the Faculty of Letters, Lecture hall named "Kidder Hall Ryokuen", and the Library)
2002
(14th year of the Heisei Era)
Kuyper Memorial Hall and the junior and senior high school building renovated.
2004
(16th year of the Heisei Era)
The Department of Communication Studies, the Faculty of Letters instituted. The Department of Musicology in the College of Music renamed the Department of Musical Arts.
2005
(17th year of the Heisei Era)
The Department of Vocal Music and the Department of Instrumental Music incorporated into the Department of Performing Arts.
2008
(20th year of the Heisei Era)
The Graduate School (Master's Course) in Communication Studies, the Division of Humanities instituted.
2009
(21st year of the Heisei Era)
The Division of Music at Graduate School reorganized into Master's Course of Musical Arts and Master's Course of Performing Arts.
2010
(22nd year of the Heisei Era)
140th anniversary of the university founding. Doctoral Course in Graduate School, Communication Studies, the Division of Humanities instituted.
2012
(24th year of the Heisei Era)
Yamate Campus facility expanded(Building 8 refurbished).
2014
(26th year of the Heisei Era)
The Department of English Literature, the Faculty of Letters renamed the Department of English Language and Literature.
The Department of Japanese Literature, the Faculty of Letters renamed Department of Japanese Language and Literature.
2015
(27th year of the Heisei Era)
50th anniversary of the university founding. 
2017
(29th year of the Heisei Era)
The Center for the Liberal Arts is established.